Increasing Agriculture Output by 2030

One of the Sustainable Development Goals developed by the United Nations is to increase agricultural production by 40 percent. It has further identified this as one of the goals with the most value for money spent on its accomplishment, according to an article published on Huffington Post.

If agriculture production can be increased by 40 percent, then child malnutrition can be reduced by 40 percent. In particular, proponents want to see every child in the world eat a more balanced diet during their first two years of life. It says that this program will cost about $11 billion each year. In return, 68 million children annually would no longer be starving to death.

The United Nations feels that an important place to start is to reduce trade restrictions so that food can freely be sold in multiple countries. Researchers in the Netherlands suggest that this would increase the income of people in the developing world by $1,00 each year until 2030.

Farmers would earn an additional $84 billion dollars each year. Not only would children not go hungry, but increasing production would also mean 80 million fewer adults would go hungry.

Increasing production by 40 percent by 2030 must start with taking better care of what farmers are producing today. Almost 25 percent of all food produced in the world is loss between the field and the dinner table. While a big juicy steak hot off the grill tastes great, beef is less efficient on resources than many other foods including chicken and pork. The amount of grains available for harvesting from the same amount of acreage must be increased particularly in Africa. Better conservation agriculture including crop rotation, mulching, planting crops between forests and improved tillage must be implemented around the globe. Developing crops that grow well on degraded lands is an important step. Acquaculture production must be increased.

Increasing agriculture production by 40 percent is an accomplishable goal. It will take everyone working together. People must learn to eat differently. The government must spend more money. Teachers must teach new farming techniques which must be accepted by locals.