Are Greenhouse Gases Causing Increased Tree Growth?

Climate change has been in the news a lot recently. The earth is getting measurably warmer, polar ice caps are melting, and the weather is seemingly more unpredictable all the time. At the heart of the problem is the excess of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The only thing that can really help reduce the carbon dioxide, besides reducing the greenhouse gases, is trees. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, removing it from the air and releasing oxygen. This has been the basis of efforts to increase the forests, as well as efforts to fight deforesting such as cutting down the Amazon rainforest.

Most of the climate change news is bad, but here has been some good news recently. Several studies have shown that there has been an increase in tree growth. Valuewalk.com feels this means that more carbon dioxide is being absorbed, slowing the effects of climate change a little. This has led to an interesting question that scientists have begun to consider. Are trees growing faster because of the increase in carbon dioxide? Since photosynthesis happens when plants absorb carbon dioxide, scientists are studying whether increased greenhouse gases have led to the increased tree growth. Currently they do not have an answer, and of course, people are continuing to decimate forests. The bottom line is that when the forests are gone, it won’t matter how quickly the trees grow.